OOS Sculpture

Pythagoras Theorum

1981 / Chief Baba Shongo Obadina / Columbus

Theorum 2.jpg

“Pythagoras Theorum” by Chief Baba Shongo Obadina is a series of copper rectangular geometric shapes that form a triangular void, referencing the mathematical rule. Pythagoras' theorem, also known as the right triangle theorem, states that the length of the two legs of a right triangle can be used to find the length of the hypotenuse. Though the theorem is named after the Greek philosopher and mathematician, Pythagoras, there is evidence that suggests ancient Egyptians and other Mesopotamian societies had discovered the right triangle theorem long before Pythagorus was born. Chief Baba Shongo Obadina's sculpture touches on the whitewashing of academic achievement in Eurocentric mathematics. Evidence shows that people of color were using these mathematical principles long before the Greeks, yet the Greeks were credited with their discovery and continue to be praised for their scholarly endeavors.

Chief Baba Shongo Obadina is an artist, curator and founder of the William H. Thomas Gallery and Urban Cultural Arts foundation. This Columbus native used his arts and culture to not only inspire those around him, but to make a change in the inner city of Columbus. In 1976, he founded his gallery, affectionately known as the “art gallery in the hood” as a space “for artists to showcase and appreciate cultural expression without being limited by ‘mainstream’ galleries.” All of Chief Baba Shongo Obadina's work reflects his love of African culture and art and his dedication to the Yoruba tradition of telling stories of important events, places, and time throughout history. The William H. Thomas Gallery still stands proudly at 1270 Bryden Road in Columbus.

Visit “Pythagoras Theorum” in front of the William H. Thomas Gallery.

Location: William H Thomas Gallery, 1270 Bryden Rd

County

: Franklin

Citation

: Chief Baba Shongo Obadina, “Pythagoras Theorum ,” Ohio Outdoor Sculpture , accessed September 24, 2020, http://oos.sculpturecenter.org/index.php/items/show/1390.

Dublin Core

Title

Pythagoras Theorum

Description

“Pythagoras Theorum” by Chief Baba Shongo Obadina is a series of copper rectangular geometric shapes that form a triangular void, referencing the mathematical rule. Pythagoras' theorem, also known as the right triangle theorem, states that the length of the two legs of a right triangle can be used to find the length of the hypotenuse. Though the theorem is named after the Greek philosopher and mathematician, Pythagoras, there is evidence that suggests ancient Egyptians and other Mesopotamian societies had discovered the right triangle theorem long before Pythagorus was born. Chief Baba Shongo Obadina's sculpture touches on the whitewashing of academic achievement in Eurocentric mathematics. Evidence shows that people of color were using these mathematical principles long before the Greeks, yet the Greeks were credited with their discovery and continue to be praised for their scholarly endeavors.

Chief Baba Shongo Obadina is an artist, curator and founder of the William H. Thomas Gallery and Urban Cultural Arts foundation. This Columbus native used his arts and culture to not only inspire those around him, but to make a change in the inner city of Columbus. In 1976, he founded his gallery, affectionately known as the “art gallery in the hood” as a space “for artists to showcase and appreciate cultural expression without being limited by ‘mainstream’ galleries.” All of Chief Baba Shongo Obadina's work reflects his love of African culture and art and his dedication to the Yoruba tradition of telling stories of important events, places, and time throughout history. The William H. Thomas Gallery still stands proudly at 1270 Bryden Road in Columbus.

Visit “Pythagoras Theorum” in front of the William H. Thomas Gallery.

Date

1981

Source

http://www.galleryinthehood.com/ucaf
http://www.pps.k12.or.us/depts-c/mc-me/be-af-ma.pdf

Sculpture Item Type Metadata

Location City

Location County

Location Site

William H Thomas Gallery

Location Street

1270 Bryden Rd

Creation Date

1981